Other Norfolk manors and church monuments

Buckenham Ferry
(Grid Ref: TG 356 059)

Sir Henry Inglose was lord in 1447, but in his will of 1450 he orders it to be sold. It came to Sir John Jermy senior (after William Norwich), who, in his will dated 24 October 1487, styles himself of Buckenham Ferry. He required to be buried in the church of St John of Metfield; 3s 4d to be given to the church of St Nicholas, Buckenham; and to the fabrick of every church, whereof he was patron, 20s. To Margaret his wife, the manor for life, with the advowson, and that of Hasingham, with a messuage called Lightfolys; after to be sold, and the money distributed for pious uses.

Ref: Blomefield, F. 1805. Topographical History of the County of Norfolk. 7. 213


Brome Hall Manor, Blo-Norton
(Grid Ref: TM 008 796)

Left to Henry Brome, son and heir of John Brome, Esq, who left it to James Brome, his son and heir. He died without issue about 1510, and it descended to his two sisters, Mary Jermy (nee Brome), and Ann, first married to Robert Stede, Esq, after to John Brampton, and then to Robert Rookwood, Gent. At her death the whole went to Thomas Brampton, her son and heir, who had purchased the other moiety in 1553, of Edward Jermy, son and heir of Mary Brome, by Jermy, her first husband. She and Ralph Shelton, Esq, son of Sir John Shelton, knight, her second husband, joining to make a complete title; and thus it was joined to Semere Hall Manor.

Ref: Blomefield, F. 1805. Topographical History of the County of Norfolk. 1. 243


Uphall Manor, or Boylands, Tasburgh
(Grid Ref: TM 197 956)

Sold to Gascoign Weld in the late 1600's, who left it to Joseph Weld his son, serjeant at law, whose two daughters, Elizabeth and Mary inherited. Elizabeth married Richard Rutter of Kingsley, Cheshire, and Mary married William Starkey, clerk, whose daughter Mary inherited the whole, and carried it to her husband, John Jermy of Bayfield in Norfolk, Esq, whose only son and heir, William Jermy, Esq later became lord.

Ref: Blomefield, F. 1805. Topographical History of the County of Norfolk. 5. 215


Little Hockham
(Grid Ref: TL 950 910)

In 1538, Ambrose Jermyn was lord. It after belonged to the Bedingfields, and in 1572 Edmund Jermyn died seized. In 1603 William Jermyn had it, and released it to Robert Jermyn, knight and William Jermyn senior, Esq. It was subsequently owned by William Jermy of Norwich, Esq in right of his wife Elizabeth, who was sister and sole heiress of the Right Hon. the Lord Richardson, Baron of Cramond in Scotland. The fines are at the lords will, and the eldest son in heir.

Ref: Blomefield, F. 1805. Topographical History of the County of Norfolk. 1. 465


St Margaret, Morton on the hill
(Grid Ref: TG 122 171)

In the church, a gravestone with the arms of Jermy, Thomas Jermy, died 4 September 1503, and impaling Yelverton; Jermy impaling Brampton. His portrature is in brass and in armour.

(There is some confusion here, because Blomefield also mentions a similar tomb in St Andrew, Felmingham (v11 p38))

Ref: Blomefield, F. 1805. Topographical History of the County of Norfolk.8. 237


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